Tuesday, 29 June 2010

Ofcom Gives Product Placement The Nod…But At What Cost?!


So the latest excitement today comes from media watchdog Ofcom who have just announced their approval for product placement in British TV programmes.

The move has been welcomed by commercial radio, which says it will otherwise be at a disadvantage when product placement starts on TV.

But what do others think?

Whilst many brands out there may initially jump for joy at the prospect of placing our products on TV in an editorial format, have we thought about what impact this will have on PR?
Will this new phenomenon put an end to any ‘free’ product placement that we PRs may have worked so hard to achieve previously?

And furthermore, if the popularity of magazines is reportedly dropping with the ever increasing rise of information being made available via the internet, will consumers now be looking to their favourite TV programme to see what products are hot or will they still rely on the editorial credibility of leading consumer publications?

Let us know your thoughts…

Photo credit: marahcreative.com

3 comments:

  1. This will have a big change on how PROs generate TV coverage for their clients, there could however be a war between advertising and PR as to who should technically look after this area.

    It will also be interesting to see if magazine type shows (such as This Morning, The Gadget Show, etc) will get involved, surely as they 'review' products it would be unethical for them to charge a fee to brands to be included in this, the small brands would never get a look in!

    After TV channels turning to brand made programmes such as the Vodafone Hollyoaks music show on T4 and the Sky+ world of skipping ads I expect this is a breath of fresh air for commercial TV stations to finally see their advertising revenue increase rather than decline.

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  2. I'm not sure what you mean about it being welcomed by radio? Surely they would be at a disadvantage by it being approved - more competition with the advertisers etc?

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  3. The move has been welcomed by commercial radio, which says it will otherwise be at a disadvantage when product placement starts on TV. But critics of product placement don't want any blurring of the line which separates editorial content from commercial messages.

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